Argentine Ambassador Summoned to the Foreign Office

3 Dec

Argentina’s Ambassador to the United Kingdom was summoned to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on Monday to receive complaints from the British Government about harassment of shipping following the cancellation of two cruise ship visits to the Falklands. Alicia CastroThe visits were cancelled following an attack on the shipping line’s agent in Buenos Aires.

Less formal invitations had been ignored by the Ambassador, Alicia Castro, so she was summoned; a diplomatic maneuver that an Ambassador cannot ignore.

In a statement following the meeting, a Foreign Office spokesman said; “It is shameful that elements within a large country like Argentina should seek to strangle the economy of a small group of islands. Such action benefits nobody and only condemns those who lend it support. We were disappointed that it was necessary formally to summon the ambassador into the Foreign Office. We made several attempts to arrange for a less formal meeting, each of which the Argentine embassy declined.”

The Argentine Ambassador was said to have objected to being summoned and denied that her Government was involved in any harassment.

The Falkland islands were first claimed by Britain in 1765. Argentina dates its own claim to 1833 when the British Royal Navy ejected a trespassing garrison of soldiers sent from Buenos Aires. Argentina again attempted to take the archipelago by force in 1982 resulting in the Falklands War between the two countries. Argentina is now using economic means to force Britain to negotiate over sovereignty of the Falklands.

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10 Responses to “Argentine Ambassador Summoned to the Foreign Office”

  1. CLopez December 4, 2012 at 12:30 pm #

    Argentina dates its own claim to 1810, liar.

    • lordton1955 December 4, 2012 at 2:33 pm #

      Argentina continually goes on about 1833. Argentina did not exist until 1816 and hardly then.

    • S. Coffed McCake December 4, 2012 at 3:13 pm #

      You’re quite the brainbox, aren’t you! (hint: 1810 minus 1765 equals 45)

      • Clematys December 5, 2012 at 5:17 am #

        Imperialists protest in Belfast as councillors vote to curtail the flying of the union flag… In the meantime, on the other side of the World, their counterparts in the South Atlantic are resisting changes and refuse to abandon their antics and join the modern World. There’s nothing better than time itself to make justice prevail.

      • lordton1955 December 5, 2012 at 5:44 am #

        As Belfast is decidely British it would actually be strange for them not to fly the Union Jack. Don’t you fly the tricolour in Buenos Aires?? As for South America not joining the modern world – I couldn’t agree more 🙂

      • Clematys December 5, 2012 at 9:31 am #

        Apparently Belfast isn’t as British as you would like them to be. Imperialists and colonialists would like to fly their flags all over their declining empires, but they are a breed decidedly in extinction, and will soon be mentioned only on the worse chapters of History books. South America is much bigger than your intellect will ever be, go figure.

      • lordton1955 December 5, 2012 at 11:34 am #

        I fear South America has no intellect at all. Go figure

      • Clematys December 5, 2012 at 3:38 pm #

        Fears unfounded.

  2. Lincoln Ariel December 6, 2012 at 3:03 pm #

    las cosas se pondran mas duras debido al desprecio kelper y britanico hacia la nacion argentina,sino quieren tener nada con nosotros pues no tendran nada, ni paso por nuestro mar de embarcaciones que se dirijan alli,es logico,defendemos nuestros recursos y nuestro territorio usurpado.y tambien se les hara muy duro en sudamerica,apenas saquen una gota e petroleo probablemente se corte su ultimo vuelo al continente,les conviene sentarse a hablar con Argentina ,nadie lespide transpaso total de soberania hay muchas otras opciones,dialogar!!

    • lordton1955 December 6, 2012 at 11:06 pm #

      There is nothing to talk about. Everything was said between 1965 and 1982.

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