The Falklands’ Question

1 Nov

The peoples of the Falkland Islands are being consulted on the appropriate question to be asked in next years referendum on the status of the South Atlantic archipelago.

The consultation document states; ” The current political status of the Falkland Islands is that they are an Overseas Territory of the United Kingdom. The Islands are internally self-governing, with the United Kingdom being responsible for matters including defence and foreign affairs. Under the Falkland Islands Constitution the people of the Falkland Islands have the right to self-determination, which they can exercise at any time. Given that Argentina is calling for negotiations over the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands, this referendum is being undertaken to consult the people regarding their views on the political status of the Falkland Islands. Should the majority of votes cast be against the current status, the Falkland Islands Government will undertake necessary consultation and preparatory work in order to conduct a further referendum on alternative options.

“Do you wish the Falkland Islands to retain their current political status as an Overseas Territory of the United Kingdom?”

The consultation period lasts until November 21st and a number of Public Meetings are being proposed to debate the issue.

The Falkland Islands have been British since 1765. Argentina claims to have a right to the islands ‘inherited’ from the Spanish in 1816 when they declared their independence. Argentina was warned about its pretensions in a diplomatic note in November 1829 but attempted to seize the Falklands by force in 1832. They also attempted the same in 1982. On both occasions the Argentine force was expelled.

 

http://www.scribd.com/doc/103755318/Falklands-War-The-First-400-Years-PDF

5 Responses to “The Falklands’ Question”

  1. CLopez November 3, 2012 at 4:03 am #

    The Falkland Islands can’t be British since 1765 because from 1774 to 1829 (55 years) they made no claim or assertion of sovereignty, effectively losing any alleged rights over them.

    Argentina, on the other hand, considered the Malvinas as part of its territory since the first days of the revolution in 1810: http://www.escolares.com.ar/historia/oficio-de-cornelio-savedra-sobre-las-islas-malvinas.html
    because at that time it was still occupied by Spanish troops, many of them ‘criollos’ of the new countries.

    • lordton1955 November 3, 2012 at 7:18 am #

      No claim or assertion was required as that had been made in 1765. What Argentina ‘considered’ in 1810 is irrelevant, as is the assertion that Spanish troops still occupied the presidio on East Falkland. What the Spanish did is not relevant to Argentina.

    • Clematys November 4, 2012 at 8:21 am #

      The British also tried to take possession of the Trindade and Martim Vaz islands in the South Atlantic. The British planned to use the islands as a cable station. However, Brazilian diplomatic efforts, along with Portuguese support, reinstated the islands to Brazilian sovereignty.

  2. Don Alberto November 4, 2012 at 10:45 am #

    Gosh! how many times do we have to go over this old ground?

    HMS Clio arrived in January 1833 and expelled Pinedo and his garrison of 26 soldiers plus their families, three foreigners and a prisoner. [1]

    At that time there were 33 civilians settled on the islands, 29 of whom preferred to stay under British sovereignity. Four civilians preferred to leave; they did NOT want to come to Buenos Aires but to Montevideo in Banda Oriental (Uruguay). Judged by their names, one couple was Brazilian and given their preferred destination, the other couple were most likely from present day Uruguay.

    1. Commencing 1833 and through December 1849 the state of Buenos Aires regularly and officially protested British sovereignity in diplomatic letters and in the “Message to Congress”. [2]

    2. In 1849 the “Convention between Great Britain and the Argentine Confederation” was signed, and in May 1850 it was ratified in Buenos Aires. [3]
    Following the ratification, Argentina no longer protested and the Falkland Islands were not mentioned in the “Messages to Congress” for 91 years until 1941, except once, 20 January 1888, when Argentine Foreign Minister Norberto Quirno Costa protested to Britain against Britain’s possession of the Falklands. [2]

    In 1859/1861 Argentina came into existence as a conglomerate of the many factions who fought a bitter civil war against each other from 1816 and not ending until the hostilities culminated in the 1861 Battle of Pavón, with a victory on the part of Bartolomé Mitre and Buenos Ayres over Urquiza’s national forces. President Santiago Derqui, who had been backed by Urquiza, resigned and the Argentine Confederation was replaced by the Argentine Republic on 17 December 1861.

    3. In President Bartolomé Mitre’s message at the opening of the Argentine Congress on 1 May 1865: “… no ha habido sino motivos para consolidar las relaciones amistosas que existen entre éste y aquellos gobiernos.” [4] “there was nothing to prevent the consolidation of friendly relations between this country and those governments [France and Britain].”

    4. Vice-president Marcos Paz’s opening speach to the Argentine Congress, 1 May 1866: “… perjuicios sufridos por súbditos ingleses en 1845. Aun no se ha resuelto esta cuestión que es la única que con aquella nación subsiste.” [5]) “… damages suffered by English subjects in 1845. This question, which is the only one between us and the British nation, which has not yet been settled.” “The British Government has accepted the President of the Republic of Chile as arbitrator in the reclamation pending with the Argentine Republic, for damages suffered by English subjects in 1845. This question, which is the only one between us and the British nation, has not yet been settled.”

    5. President Domingo Faustino Sarmiento’s “Message to the Argentine Congress”, 1 May 1869: “… Nada nos reclaman las otras Naciónes: nada tenemos que pedir de ellas, sino es la continuación de las manifestaciones de simpatía …”. [6] “Nothing is claimed from us by other nations; we have nothing to ask of them except that they will persevere/(assuming their spirit of justice) in manifesting their sympathies …”

    6. 1881: The ‘Latzina’ Map, “Mapa Geográfico de la República Argentina …”, Buenos Aires 1882 (dated 1881), based on the treaty of 23 July 1881, financed by the Argentine Foreign Ministry and published in 120,000 copies, distributed to Argentine consulates all over the world shows Argentina in one colour and non-Argentina in another. [7]

    7. 1881/82: the map ‘Limites Australes de la Republica Argentina’ [8] dated 1881 does not show the Falklands Islands as part of Argentina.

    8. 1905: The map of Argentina’s military regions from 1905 [9] does not include the Falkland Islands at all.

    So we have a time line:

    1833: British sovereignity re-installed (or for the sake of argument: installed).
    1833-1849: Protests.
    1850: Treaty ratified.
    1850-1887: No protests, no claim.
    1865: No protests, no claim, we have friendly relations.
    1866: The Argentine vice-president see only one dispute, that of damages suffered by English subjects in 1845.
    1869: Nothing is claimed from us by other nations; we have nothing to ask of them
    1881: A map, which does not show the Falklands Islands as part of Argentina.
    1881/82: A map showing one colour for Argentina and another for other countries’ possessions, including the Falkland Islands.
    1888: One single protest, in the form of a diplomatic letter.
    1889-1941: No protests, no claim.
    1905: The map of Argentina’s military regions from 1905 does not show the Falklands Islands as part of Argentina.

    Notes:

    [1] “Lista de la tropa, sus familias y peones de la isla de Malvinas”. http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5053/5533028871_5a2bfae23c_b.jpg + fotografia de la lista original http://www.flickr.com/photos/52978952@N04/5533643350/sizes/l/in/photostream/

    [2] Alfredo Becerra: “Protestas por Malvinas 1833-1946”, Buenos Aires, 1998. http://www.angelfire.com/ab/cajaedit/kjimalvin.html

    [3] 1850.05.15 Convención Para Restablecer Las Perfectas Relaciones De Amistad Entre La Confederación Argentina Y Su Majestad Británica. (4751) Firma: Buenos Aires, 24 de Noviembre de 1849 Vigor: 15 de Mayo de 1850 http://tratados.cancilleria.gob.ar/tratado_archivo.php?id=3265&tipo=1

    [4] 1865.05.01 Mensaje del Presidente de la República Argentina, Bartolomé Mitre, ante la Asamblea Legislativa (1865)
    http://constitucionweb.blogspot.com.ar/2010/09/mensaje-del-presidente-de-la-republica_5176.html Original source: Heraclio Mabragaña, “Los Mensajes 1810-1910”, Buenos Aires 1910, vol. III, pag. 227 + British and Foreign State Papers, 1865-1866, printed London 1870, p. 1174

    [5] 1866.05.01 Mensaje del Vicepresidente de la República Argentina, Marcos Paz, en ejercicio del Poder Ejecutivo, ante la Asamblea Legislativa (1866)
    http://constitucionweb.blogspot.com.ar/2010/09/mensaje-del-vicepresidente-de-la_06.html Original source: Heraclio Mabragaña, “Los Mensajes 1810-1910”, Buenos Aires 1910, vol. III, pag. 238 + British and Foreign State Papers 1866-1867, printed London 1871, p. 1009

    [6] 1869.05.01 Mensaje del Presidente de La Republica Argentina Domingo Sarmientos al Abrir las Sesiones del Congreso Nacional en 1° de Mayo de 1869 – Los Mensajes Historia – p. 285 http://lanic.utexas.edu/larrp/pm/sample2/argentin/history/691200d.html Original source: Heraclio Mabragaña, “Los Mensajes 1810-1910”, Buenos Aires 1910, vol. III, pag. 286

    [7] http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/88/Map.rep.arg.1883.jpg?uselang=es

    [8] http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/ba/LaIlustracionArgentina.jpg?uselang=es

    [9] http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3a/Regiones.militares.arg.1905.jpg?uselang=es

  3. lornefirth November 5, 2012 at 10:27 am #

    by Argie quirky thinking the Romans still own England,the Vikings Scotland and so on, they are very greedy people ,could it be all the Nazis who did a runner their after WW2.

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